Faculty

Dr. Cameron R. Homeyer EMAIL
Assistant Professor, Associate Director for Graduate Programs in the School of Meteorology, Chesapeake Energy Professor of Climate Systems Science, and Head of the CCC Research Group

Voice: 405.325.5303

Dr. Homeyer joined the faculty in the School of Meteorology in July 2014. He completed all three of his degrees (B.S. in Meteorology, M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences) from 2004-2012 at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas prior to receiving a postdoctoral fellowship in the Advanced Study Program at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) from 2012-2014. He served as Associate Director for Undergraduate Studies in the School from 2017-2018 before moving into a similar role supporting the Graduate Program.

Postdoctoral Scientists

Dr. Tao Xian EMAIL

Tao joined the CCC group in November 2017 and is studying tropopause dynamics, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, and deep convection. She completed her B.S. in Atmospheric Sciences at SUN YAT-SEN University in 2009 and Ph.D. in Space Physics at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in 2014. Prior to her arrival at the University of Oklahoma, Tao served as a Postdoctoral Researcher and Associate Researcher at USTC.

Graduate Students

Elisa Murillo EMAIL
Ph.D. Student

Elisa joined the CCC group in August 2016 and has completed studies of severe storms using ground-based radar observations and high-resolution satellite imagery, with a focus on severe hail events and above-anvil cirrus plumes. She is a core participant in the NASA DCOTSS field project that will be conducted from 2019-2023 and her primary research focus is on understanding the dynamics and chemistry of above-anvil cirrus plumes. She completed a B.S. in Atmospheric Science at the University of Louisiana-Monroe in May 2016 and an M.S. in Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma in December 2018.

Amanda Murphy EMAIL
Ph.D. Student

Amanda joined the CCC group in December 2019 and is studying severe storms using an extensive set of NEXRAD WSR-88D radar observations. Future work may involve numerical model simulations of severe storms. She completed a B.S. in Meteorology at the University of Illinois in May 2016 and an M.S. in Meteorology at OU in August 2018.

Ryan Bunker EMAIL
M.S. Student

Ryan joined the CCC group in August 2018 and is studying ground-based radar observations of extreme precipitation events (see PRES2iP). He completed a B.S. in Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma in May 2018.

Emily Tinney EMAIL
M.S. Student

Emily joined the CCC group in August 2018 and is studying the impact of convection on the composition of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere using ground-based radar observations, satellite-based trace gas observations, and a trajectory model. She completed a B.S. in Meteorology at Central Michigan University in May 2018.

Tyler Young EMAIL
M.S. Student

Tyler joined the CCC group in July 2019 and is studying tropopause-overshooting convection and its relation to severe weather using radar, satellite, and aircraft observations. His work is supported by the NASA DCOTSS field project that will be conducted from 2019-2023. He completed a B.S. in Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois in May 2019.

Undergraduate Researchers

Andrea Gordon

Andrea joined the CCC group in June 2018 and has been running and analyzing trajectory calculations initialized in tropopause-overshooting storms over the United States. She is currently pursuing a B.S. in Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma.

Recent Alumni

  • Dan Phoenix – Graduate researcher from August 2015 – December 2019. Dan completed his Ph.D. in December 2019 and worked on several numerical modeling projects. All of these projects were focused on transport within tropopause-overshooting convection using WRF-Chem. Dan is now a postdoc in the SUNY system.
  • Thea Sandmæl – Graduate researcher from August 2015 – December 2018. Thea completed her M.S. in Meteorology in December 2017 and worked on several projects that examined the value of 4D radar observations and 1-min satellite imagery for discriminating between tornadic and non-tornadic storms. These included long-term statistical evaluations and data science applications. Thea now works in CIMMS/NSSL at OU developing and testing algorithms to identify tornadoes in radar observations.
  • Aodhan Sweeney – Undergraduate researcher from May-July 2018, supported by NSF via a Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program in the National Weather Center. Aodhan is now pursuing a graduate degree in Atmospheric Science.